Understanding inchoate crimes in South Carolina

| Jul 20, 2021 | Blog, White Collar Crimes |

Inchoate crimes come in three varieties: attempted, solicited and conspired. Inchoate crimes are crimes that were planned but never fully happened for one reason for another. For example, attempted murder is an inchoate crime. Conspiracies by organized groups that are blown by the FBI are still crimes even if they never come to fruition.

Inchoate white-collar crimes

When it comes to white-collar crimes, inchoate crimes usually involve conspiracy. White-collar crimes are non-violent in nature. They do hurt people, but mostly by taking their money rather than threatening them with harm. For example, two people making a plan to steal money from a company could be considered an inchoate crime.

People who provide assistance before and during an attempted crime can be considered accomplices. It’s possible that they may be charged, too, when there’s an inchoate white-collar crime. An accomplice is generally treated as having the same level of guilt as the person who planned and executed criminal actions.

Defending against inchoate criminal charges

There are two main ways to defend against charges of an inchoate crime. Some criminal defense attorneys may pursue a “perfect defense,” seeking to face the charges head-on and secure an acquittal. Others may pursue an imperfect defense, which means they want to see the charges reduced. The goal is to get a lesser sentence with an imperfect defense.

If you or a loved one has been charged with an inchoate crime, you will need a criminal defense attorney. A lawyer may be able to help you clear your name. You should ask for advice that may put you in good standing with the judge and jury.