If you have received a sentence of probation, it will allow you to be released from custody if you maintain good behavior. During your time on probation, you will remain under supervision to make sure you are following the rules set forth in your probation ruling. You should not consider a probation as something that lets you go free after a conviction.

Probation rules can range from restricting your movements to attending a treatment program for a certain number of hours. You may have to also serve community service hours and regularly check-in with your probation officer.

How you violate your probation

If you break any of the rules contained in your probation violation, you can face consequences such as fines, a longer sentence of probation or even jail. A violation occurs when you avoid, ignore or just plain refuse the terms and conditions of your probation. Probation violations can include:

  • Missing scheduled court appearances
  • Failure to report to your probation officer
  • Not paying fines or restitution that was ordered by the court
  • Being in contact with certain people or going to areas that are off limits
  • Using, possessing or selling drugs.
  • Getting arrested

What happens after a parole violation?

If you violate any of the above provisions, there can be an order for your arrest issued. You can be arrested by a law enforcement officer or your probation officer may have the authority to make the arrest.

Consequences of violating parole:

  • A judge may decide to order an extension to the terms of your probation.
  • The terms of your probation may be modified for additional items.
  • The terms of the probation may be revoked and the original sentence may be enacted.

Violating a probation can be a serious offense that can cause significant penalties including jail. If you are given a probation penalty, you should follow the terms that are laid out to avoid fines, revocation or jail time.